The Soviet special camp No.7 / No. 1 1945 - 1950

Introduction to the history of the Soviet special camp No. 7 and No. 1

The history of the Soviet secret service's camps in Germany must be seen in the light of both the events of the second war and the history of the Soviet gulags. During the major war conferences in Teheran, Moscow and Jalta between 1943 and 1945 the US, British and Soviet governments adopted measurements to secure the future occupation of Germany. These plans were reinforced by the Potsdam agreement of 2 August 1945, to which France was a also a signatory. The plans stated that NSDAP functionaries and structures, family members of the state's instruments of terror as well as other persons that could pose a threat to the occupation or its aims should be interned in camps. These internment camps were eventually established in all of the different allied zones in Germany, in prisoner of war camps and even in ex-concentration camps.

After the war ended the Soviet secret service's camps on the front were replaced with so-called special camps which were to be used for long term internment. The Soviets built 10 special camps in the German territories which they were occupying, five of which were in Brandenburg. They were not controlled by the Soviet military administration in Germany, but were placed directly under the control of the Soviet secret service in Moscow.

More informations:

The Soviet special camp No.7 / No. 1 1945 - 1950
Introduction to the history of the Soviet special camp No. 7 and No. 1
Construction of special camp No.7 / No.1
The camp's many uses
The prisoners are released: the camp is closed
The internees and the convicted
Life and death in the camp
A break in the silence
The museum 'Soviet special camp'